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Henna Tattoo

From as little as just £5

A patch test is required at least 24 hours prior to having your tattoo

Henna is a natural dye that is basically crushed henna leaves mixed with water to form a paste. This paste often carries a dark brown or olive colour and once applied leaves a reddish brown colour on the skin. The stain that the tattoo leaves on the body becomes a tattoo that is used by multiple people across various traditions.
Henna is very similar to ordinary tattoos in terms of application, except they have no pain associated with them and are not permanent. The natural henna dye seeps into your skin and leaves a stain that essentially turns into a tattoo.
Although you cannot change the colour of your tattoo, you won’t have the painful process of getting a tattoo, or the permanent nature of the tattoo.
Henna is also naturally made, making it completely safe and free of allergens.

 
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History of Henna

Many sources believe that henna was first found in the deserts of India, where a small tribe began using the paste of the plant on their hands and feet as it made them feel cooler. It didn’t take long before a creative individual preferred to actually create designs rather than simply smearing the paste on their body.

The Process

Getting a henna tattoo is almost therapeutic in a way and is a lot more relaxing than most people expect.
Our artist uses freehand when working on a henna tattoo and takes minutes or hours, depending on the design that you want to get. Once they apply the tattoo, the real challenge is waiting for the tattoo to dry.
Henna tattoos stay on the skin for a long time so that it can properly stain the skin. This means that you will have to be careful not to remove it before it is able to properly settle in the skin.
We recommend that you do not remove the henna yourself, instead just allow it to dry and fall off itself. This ensures that the tattoo does not fade faster than intended.

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